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Accuracy, intra- and inter-rater reliability of three scoring systems for the glottic view at videolaryngoscopy

From Anaesthesia - 24. March 2017 - 9:48
Summary

An accurate and reproducible recording of laryngoscopic view at tracheal intubation is an important aspect of anaesthetic practice. Unlike direct laryngoscopy, in which the view achieved by the line of sight directly relates to the ease of intubating the trachea, videolaryngoscopy can create a situation in which the view is good, but intubation difficult or impossible. Communicating this to a subsequent anaesthetist is important. We compared three scoring systems: Cormack and Lehane; POGO (percentage of glottic opening); and the Fremantle score, as used by 74 critical care doctors rating 30 anonymised videos of videolaryngoscopic intubations. Accuracy (degree of agreement of score with an expert panel assessment) was higher for POGO (75.5%) and the Fremantle score (73.9%) than for Cormack and Lehane (65.4%; p < 0.001). Intra-rater reliability (mean free marginal Kappa for ordinal scores and mean Cronbach's Alpha for continuous score) was higher for Fremantle score (0.796) and Cormack and Lehane (0.773) than POGO (0.693). Inter-rater reliability for Fremantle score (0.618) and POGO (0.614) were similar and higher than the inter-rater reliability of Cormack and Lehane 0.464 (p < 0.001). The higher accuracy and inter-rater reliability of POGO and the Fremantle score suggest they are preferable to Cormack and Lehane for use when documenting videolaryngoscopy. The additional information about ease of intubation conveyed by the Fremantle score may support its routine use in recording videolaryngoscopic intubation.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

A pilot study of ultrasound evaluation of gastric emptying in patients with end-stage renal failure: a comparison with healthy controls

From Anaesthesia - 23. March 2017 - 9:30
Summary

This prospective study was designed to evaluate gastric volume and content in patients with renal failure and healthy controls after an overnight fast, immediately after a light meal and at 6 h after the meal. Thirty subjects in each group were recruited. At each scanning session, gastric antral cross-sectional area was measured in the supine recumbent and right lateral decubitus positions, and a qualitative assessment of gastric contents was made using the Perlas three-point grading system. Six hours after the meal, the mean (SD) antral cross-sectional area in the supine position was 471 (195) mm2 in patients with renal failure and 319 (106) mm2 in healthy controls (p = 0.028), whereas in the right lateral position it was 756 (320) and 521 (180) mm2, respectively (p = 0.21). In terms of the qualitative assessments of gastric contents, all subjects had an empty stomach after an overnight fast. Five patients with renal failure and no controls had Perlas grade 2 images, indicating significant gastric contents, 6 h after a meal (p = 0.026). This study supports the use of bedside gastric ultrasound as a point-of-care test for patients with known risk factors for delayed gastric emptying.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

Intra-oral ignition of monopolar diathermy during transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE)

From Anaesthesia - 21. March 2017 - 5:30
Summary

We present the case of unanticipated airway ignition during hard palate biopsy. Transnasal humidified rapid-insufflation ventilatory exchange (THRIVE) and monopolar diathermy were utilised for the procedure, during which an arc arose from the diathermy tip to a titanium implant, causing a brief ignition on the monopolar diathermy grip. This case highlights the need for maintained awareness of fire risk when using diathermy in the presence of THRIVE during airway surgery.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

Long-term outcomes and cost effectiveness of high-dose dexamethasone for cardiac surgery: a randomised trial

From Anaesthesia - 20. March 2017 - 6:05
Summary

Prophylactic intra-operative administration of dexamethasone may improve short-term clinical outcomes in cardiac surgical patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term clinical outcomes and cost effectiveness of dexamethasone versus placebo. Patients included in the multicentre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled DExamethasone for Cardiac Surgery (DECS) trial were followed up for 12 months after their cardiac surgical procedure. In the DECS trial, patients received a single intra-operative dose of dexamethasone 1 mg.kg−1 (n = 2239) or placebo (n = 2255). The effects on the incidence of major postoperative events were evaluated. Also, overall costs for the 12-month postoperative period, and cost effectiveness, were compared between groups. Of 4494 randomised patients, 4457 patients (99%) were followed up until 12 months after surgery. There was no difference in the incidence of major postoperative events, the relative risk (95%CI) being 0.86 (0.72-1.03); p = 0.1. Treatment with dexamethasone reduced costs per patient by £921 [€1084] (95%CI £−1672 to −137; p = 0.02), mainly through reduction of postoperative respiratory failure and duration of postoperative hospital stay. The probability of dexamethasone being cost effective compared with placebo was 97% at a threshold value of £17,000 [€20,000] per quality-adjusted life year. We conclude that intra-operative high-dose dexamethasone did not have an effect on major adverse events at 12 months after cardiac surgery, but was associated with a reduction in costs. Routine dexamethasone administration is expected to be cost effective at commonly accepted threshold levels for cost effectiveness.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

The AAGBI calls for a change to the culture around night shift working

AAGBI News - 16. March 2017 - 10:16
Thu, 16/03/2017

On World Sleep Day, which highlights the importance of getting adequate sleep, the Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland (AAGBI) sets out its three-point plan to address the culture surrounding doctor fatigue in hospitals and tackle the problem of excessive fatigue, which is known to impair decision making, with consequences for both doctors and their patients.

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Categories: AAGBI News

Evaluation of a flexible bronchoscope prototype designed for bronchoscopy during mechanical ventilation: a proof-of-concept study

From Anaesthesia - 15. March 2017 - 5:55
Summary

Bronchoscopy during mechanical ventilation of patients' lungs significantly affects ventilation because of partial obstruction of the tracheal tube, and may thus be omitted in the most severely ill patients. It has not previously been possible to reduce the external diameter of the bronchoscope without reducing the diameter of the suction channel, thus reducing the suctioning capacity of the device. We believed that a better-designed bronchoscope could improve the safety of bronchoscopy in patients whose lungs were ventilated. We designed a flexible bronchoscope prototype with a drumstick-shaped head consisting of a long, thin proximal portion; a short and large distal portion for camera docking; and a large suction channel throughout the length of the device. The aims of our study were to test the impact of our prototype on mechanical ventilation when inserted into the tracheal tube, and to assess suctioning capacity. We first tested the efficiency of the suction channel, and demonstrated that the suction flow of the prototype was similar to that of conventional adult bronchoscopes. We next evaluated the consequences of bronchoscopy when using the prototype on minute ventilation and intrathoracic pressures during mechanical ventilation: firstly, in vitro using a breathing simulator; and secondly, in vivo using a porcine model of pulmonary ventilation. The insertion of adult bronchoscopes into the tracheal tube immediately impaired the protective ventilation strategy employed, whereas the prototype preserved it. For the first time, we have developed an innovative flexible bronchoscope designed for bronchoscopy during invasive mechanical ventilation, that both preserved the protective ventilation strategy, and enabled efficient suction flow.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

A prospective, randomised trial of pre-oxygenation strategies available in the pre-hospital environment

From Anaesthesia - 14. March 2017 - 6:05
Summary

Pre-oxygenation before tracheal intubation aims to increase safe apnoea duration by denitrogenation of the functional residual capacity of the lungs, and increasing oxygen stores at the onset of apnoea. Pre-oxygenation options in the pre-hospital environment are limited due to oxygen availability and equipment portability. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of strategies available in this setting. This was a prospective, randomised, crossover study of 30 healthy volunteers who underwent 3-min periods of pre-oxygenation by tidal volume breathing with a non-rebreather mask, a bag-valve-mask and a portable ventilator. The primary outcome measure was fractional expired oxygen concentration of the first exhaled breath after each technique. The secondary outcome measure was ease of breathing, assessed using a visual analogue scale. The mean (95%CI) fractional expired oxygen concentrations achieved with the non-rebreather mask were 64 (60–68)%, bag-valve-mask 89 (86–92)% and portable ventilator 95 (94–96)%. Pre-oxygenation efficacy with the non-rebreather mask was significantly worse than with either the bag-valve-mask (p < 0.001) or ventilator (p < 0.001). No significant difference in ease of breathing was identified between the bag-valve-mask and ventilator, but both were perceived as being significantly more difficult to breathe through than the non-rebreather mask. We conclude that, in healthy volunteers, the effectiveness of pre-oxygenation by bag-valve-mask and portable ventilator was superior to pre-oxygenation with a non-rebreather mask, although the non-rebreather mask was easier to breathe through than the other pre-oxygenation devices.

Categories: From Anaesthesia

Misinterpreting the p value

From Anaesthesia - 13. March 2017 - 8:12
Categories: From Anaesthesia