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Wiley Online Library : Anaesthesia
Updated: 33 min 53 sec ago

Medical identification or alert jewellery: an opportunity to save lives or an unreliable hindrance?

5. July 2017 - 12:45
Summary

Medical identification jewellery can convey vital information to emergency responders, but mistakes and ambiguity may lead to misdiagnosis and morbidity. We performed a review of relevant articles retrieved from Pubmed®, Embase® and Scopus® and Google UK Inc. to investigate the commercial availability and issuance of these products. From 84 identified studies, we shortlisted 74 for review. The Google search retrieved 1,090,000 results within 0.57 s (January 2017). We explored 32 websites selling medical alert jewellery in the first five pages of these results. We found that patients themselves are currently responsible for the engraved wording on medical alert jewellery, with no mandatory physician checks. The accuracy and appropriateness of this information may thus vary. In the absence of national guidance in the UK, we suggest that there should be a list of specific indications warranting their use, a requirement for regular review of information, and clarity around the level of physician input into the engraving chosen. We discuss the potential benefits vs. risks of wearing medical alert jewellery and clarify the limitations of medical teams’ responsibilities in relation to patients found to be wearing them.

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A survey of UK peri-operative medicine: pre-operative care

14. June 2017 - 11:50
Summary

The majority of UK hospitals now have a Local Lead for Peri-operative Medicine (n = 115). They were asked to take part in an online survey to identify provision and practice of pre-operative assessment and optimisation in the UK. We received 86 completed questionnaires (response rate 75%). Our results demonstrate strengths in provision of shared decision-making clinics. Fifty-seven (65%, 95%CI 55.8–75.4%) had clinics for high-risk surgical patients. However, 80 (93%, 70.2–87.2%) expressed a desire for support and training in shared decision-making. We asked about management of pre-operative anaemia, and identified that 69 (80%, 71.5–88.1%) had a screening process for anaemia, with 72% and 68% having access to oral and intravenous iron therapy, respectively. A need for peri-operative support in managing frailty and cognitive impairment was identified, as few (24%, 6.5–34.5%) respondents indicated that they had access to specific interventions. Respondents were asked to rank their ‘top five’ priority topics in Peri-operative Medicine from a list of 22. These were: shared decision-making; peri-operative team development; frailty screening and its management; postoperative morbidity prediction; and primary care collaboration. We found variation in practice across the UK, and propose to further explore this variation by examining barriers and facilitators to improvement, and highlighting examples of good practice.

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Biohacking

13. June 2017 - 5:26
Categories: From Anaesthesia

Knowing when to slow down

13. June 2017 - 5:26
Categories: From Anaesthesia

Hyperoxia and surgical site infections

13. June 2017 - 5:26
Categories: From Anaesthesia

Issue Information – Editorial Board

13. June 2017 - 5:26
Categories: From Anaesthesia

A randomised, controlled trial evaluating a low cost, 3D-printed bronchoscopy simulator

12. June 2017 - 6:55
Summary

Low-fidelity, simulation-based psychomotor skills training is a valuable first step in the educational approach to mastering complex procedural skills. We developed a cost-effective bronchial tree simulator based on a human thorax computed tomography scan using rapid-prototyping (3D-print) technology. This randomised, single-blind study evaluated how realistic our 3D-printed simulator would mimic human anatomy compared with commercially available bronchial tree simulators (Laerdal® Airway Management Trainer with Bronchial Tree and AirSim Advance Bronchi, Stavanger, Norway). Thirty experienced anaesthetists and respiratory physicians used a fibreoptic bronchoscope to rate each simulator on a visual analogue scale (VAS) (0 mm = completely unrealistic anatomy, 100 mm = indistinguishable from real patient) for: localisation of the right upper lobe bronchial lumen; placement of a bronchial blocker in the left main bronchus; aspiration of fluid from the right lower lobe; and overall realism. The 3D-printed simulator was rated most realistic for the localisation of the right upper lobe bronchial lumen (p = 0.002), but no differences were found in placement of a bronchial blocker or for aspiration of fluid (p = 0.792 and p = 0.057) compared with using the commercially available simulators. Overall, the 3D-printed simulator was rated most realistic (p = 0.021). Given the substantially lower costs for the 3D-printed simulator (£85 (€100/US$110) compared with > ~ £2000 (€2350/US$2590) for the commercially available simulators), our 3D-printed simulator provides an inexpensive alternative for learning bronchoscopy skills, and offers the possibility of practising procedures on patient-specific models before attempting them in clinical practice.

Categories: From Anaesthesia